Day 2, AM

Technology, Disruption and the 'Unbundling' of Higher Education: Challenges to Traditional Modes of Education

With the proliferation of technology-enabled learning and other new modes of instruction, higher education offerings are undergoing a rapid transformation. We will discuss how institutions have begun to re-look their traditional models of teaching and learning and are adapting new models to take advantage of these technological disruptions in higher education.


Time/Room: 8.30 am – 10.00 am / Leo
Moderator: Professor Annie Koh, Vice-President, Office of Business Development, Singapore Management University, Singapore


Title
The Futures of Higher Education

Speaker
Dr Diana Oblinger

Designation
President Emerita, EDUCAUSE, USA

Synopsis
Institutions differ. Students have different skills, goals, and motivations. Career paths converge and diverge over a lifetime. Information technology offers many options, such as MOOCs, adaptive learning, game-based environments, competency-based education, badging, intrusive advising, and education-as-a-service. The rising cost of education, consumer demand, and pressure on time to degree are adding pressure for technology solutions, as well. Information technology is clearly a part of higher education's future – but there will be more than one "future."
Title
Addressing Technology and Globalisation Challenges: Experiences at the University of Tokyo

Speaker
Professor Masako Egawa

Designation
Former Executive Vice President, The University of Tokyo and Professor, Hitotsubashi University, Japan

Synopsis
The rise of MOOC and new technology brought about challenges as well as opportunities for higher education and forced research universities to think more seriously about education and learning. I will discuss the initiatives and experiences at the University of Tokyo, and in particular, how we have tried to address both technology and globalisation challenges by facilitating collaborative education and social learning. I will also introduce a few pioneering projects at various universities and discuss their implications and future trajectories.
Title
Rumours of Disruption

Speaker
Dr David T. Barnard

Designation
President and Vice-Chancellor, University of Manitoba, Canada

Synopsis
Higher education is under stress throughout the world: participation rates are rising, expectations about quality of instruction and the use of tools (especially information technology) to enhance student experience are increasing and (especially in publicly funded institutions) revenues are not rising at the same rate as costs (salaries, new technologies, and so on). Against this backdrop, many observers hope to resolve the tension by emphasizing IT-based delivery systems, using the model of disruption to shape thinking and planning.  

Realistically, the prospects are "promising, but also challenging" (William G. Bowen). How can we achieve the promise without succumbing to the challenges?  

Does the change that we need arise essentially from technology, pedagogy or business models? Other technologies have not been disruptive in the past, in spite of great initial hopes for them (television, for example). Perhaps we should be focused on engagement in the learning process, and mediation between materials and learners by people to aid in reflection, in finding learning opportunities and in taking advantage of them. Technology can play an important role, but perhaps the conversations about disruption are rumours and – at least, not yet – reality.

Topic: Reinventing the 21st Century university: new models for the student consumer
Time/Room: 10.30 am – 12.00 pm / Virgo 2 – 4


Title
New Modes of Delivery and the Challenge to Quality

Speaker
Mr Adam Tyson (MODERATOR)

Designation
Acting Director, Education and Innovation, Directorate-General for Education and Culture, European Commission

Synopsis
The title "Reinventing 21st Century University: new models for the student consumer" reflects a number of common assumptions about the development of higher education. First that the university needs to reinvent itself. Second, that students are changing and becoming more consumerist in their approach to education. And third, that the latter is a key driver of the former: that universities need to change to respond to changing student demands.  

Students may be becoming more consumerist in some contexts, but we should be careful about being purely fixated on the individual perspective. First, society as a whole has a strong interest in ensuring citizens acquire strong skills sets from higher education. And society as a whole will continue to contribute significant amounts of resources to higher education in most systems. Thus, while students should have choice, society must also have its say – in terms of steering higher education systems in directions that serve the needs of the community and not purely the individual.  

Second, at the level of each institution, the institution-student relationship is more complex than a simple commercial transaction. It is extremely positive that more attention is paid to the needs of each student. But educators will continue to guide and form students as they have always done. And students, through their participation in the classroom and outside, will continue to contribute the institution in which they learn.  

Digital technologies are changing dramatically how, what and when we learn, and the skills we need to thrive in a constantly-evolving work environment. Still Higher Education Institutions pride themselves on ensuring the quality of their offer. This responsibility will have to extend to integrating technologies and new pedagogies within normal provision, and ultimately also to any outsourced and unbundled elements.
Title
The Opportunities and Challenges of Student-centered, Learning-based Higher Education

Speaker
Dr Dewayne Matthews

Designation
Vice-President of Strategy Development, Lumina Foundation, USA

Synopsis
The sweeping changes underway in higher education institutions and systems throughout the world are truly transformative in that they affect every element of higher education. The global demand for tertiary skills and knowledge, the rapid emergence of new delivery models, the deep interrelationships between labor market shifts and life-long learning, and the desperate need to create new opportunities for students who have not traditionally been well-served by higher education are all connected at a deeper level. All represent the emergence of higher education centered on students rather than institutions, and based on learning rather than time. How do we make sense of these transformative changes when almost all policies and practices will need to adapt to changing realities? The only real way to look at them from the point of view of students and their unique pathways of learning. While the challenges are enormous, progress is being made throughout the world in developing the tools to support student centric, learning based higher education. These include stronger knowledge and skills frameworks, more flexible competency-based delivery models, pathways between technical and academic education and vice versa, and new higher education finance models.
Title
The Rise of 'Glocal' Students and New Models of Transnational Education

Speaker
Dr Rahul Choudaha

Designation
Chief Knowledge Officer and Senior Director of Strategic Development World Education Services, USA

Synopsis
Expanding consumer class in Asia is giving rise to a new segment of 'glocal' students who are willing to pay for a global educational experience while staying in their home country or region. 'Glocals' represent the emerging segment of students who seek transnational education (TNE) including international branch campuses, twinning arrangements, distance education and even experiment with the technology-enabled models of learning like MOOCs. This session will provide an overview of latest trends and research on unique characteristics of 'glocal' students and discuss its implications for the future of internationalisation through innovative transnational education models.

Topic: New curricula and pedagogies for a changing world
Time/Room: 10.30 am – 12.00 pm / Gemini 1 – 2


Title
All Aboard! Enabling & Empowering Staff and Students to Flourish in the Digital Age

Speaker
Dr Iain Mac Labhrainn

Designation
Director, Centre for Excellence in Learning and Teaching, National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland

Synopsis
In an age characterised by the ubiquity of technology and network access, education is faced with new challenges. Embracing new technologies for their potential, without being seduced by technological wizardry for its own sake, is key. A critical engagement requires a combination of knowledge, skills and confidence – none of which can be taken for granted for academics, support staff and students. In this presentation, I will outline the work being undertaken in a national project in Ireland to develop a Digital Skills Framework for higher education and which is taking a distinctive, participatory approach, building a sense of engagement and openness (sharing resources and expertise). The project recognises the importance of avoiding naive stereotypes (such as 'digital natives', 'Gen X', etc) and that the digital confidence of all those involved in the educational process (including administrative and support staff, part-time tutors, peer-mentors, etc) needs to be nurtured and supported if we wish to develop more effective and creative approaches to learning, teaching, research and enterprise.
Title
SMU's Curricula Differentiation in Higher Education Space

Speaker
Professor Annie Koh

Designation
Vice-President, Office of Business Development, Singapore Management University, Singapore

Synopsis
In a recent World Bank study published on 2013 titled “Putting Higher Education to Work – Skills and Research for Growth in East Asia”, the conclusions arising from the study are inevitable. Universities have to play a more strategic role contributing to the economic development and job creation of a country.

The study has pointed to two areas of disconnect in higher education : A gap between higher education institutions and the skill needs by employers and a weak research and technology nexus between higher education institution and companies.

Therefore, in Professor Annie Koh’s presentation, she will illustrate some examples of SMU’s role in playing a strategic role to Singapore’s trading sector without compromising the rigour and expectations of being a higher education institution. These special cases will showcase the international trading and maritime concentrations of the undergraduate programs as well as the process to encourage students to be entrepreneurial within and outside the classrooms in the area of technopreneurship.

Such curriculum enhancements represent the opportunities for many universities operating in the 21st century, provided they do not succumb to the many challenges ahead.
Title
Paradigm Shifts in the Knowledge Functions of University in the 21st Century: Implications for Teaching and Learning in Higher Education

Speaker
Professor Lee Wing On (MODERATOR)

Designation
Vice President, Administration and Development, Open University of Hong Kong, Hong

Synopsis
The learning discourse of the 21st century is characterized by the emergence of the knowledge economy, and the need for lifelong learning for learners to be able to adapt to the fast and ever changing economies of the society. This has created changing demands for the skill sets of the 21st century learners, such as the ability for critical and creative thinking, the ability for self-directed and collaborative learning, the ability to learn formally and informally, and the ability for both competition and cooperation, etc. The skill sets diverge from the almost single-faceted traditional emphasis on academic abilities, and the knowledge functions of the university is gradually changing. Knowledge creation is being regarded as possible not only by basic and discovery research, but also possible in the process of teaching, clinical practice and multi-disciplinary integration. The concept of knowledge creation has also come about, that requires the learner to create knowledge, rather than to acquire knowledge. Knowledge ownership is quietly shifting from research professors to both learners and stakeholders who will have a role in deciding what is worth to be learned . The significance of knowledge is also shifting from its simple significance in terms of discovery to being measured by its utilization and mobilization, and user's satisfaction. All these have implications for learning, and university teaching is also changing from traditional research based learning modes towards practice and internship, the opportunity for experiential learning, and the opportunity of exchange among an increasingly diversified student body, developed through the agenda of internationalization. The purpose of this presentation is to examine these changes and how the changes require our adjustment in our teaching and learning approaches, measurement, and expectations for learning outcomes in university education.

Topic: Research and teaching: unbundling or coupling?
Time/Room: 10.30 am – 12.00 pm / Aquarius 1 – 3


Title
Teaching and Research: Dr Jekyll & Mr Hyde or Bonnie & Clyde?

Speaker
Dr Josep A Planell (MODERATOR)

Designation
Rector, Universitat Oberta de Catalunya, Spain

Synopsis
Teaching and research are often seen as a trade-off, since some academics maintain that too much emphasis in research might damage teaching, and, on the other hand, some others state that allocating time to teaching might damage research abilities. In addition, teaching as a professional activity requires different skills than researching. Nonetheless, the way of looking at the teaching/research binomial is not as a trade-off, but as a balance between those two components of higher education. Rather than substitutes competing for faculty time and institutional resources, the teaching/research balance is a scale of grey colors where integration is definitely possible.
Title
Higher Education Institutions – The Case of Higher Education in Israel

Speaker
Professor Hagit Messer-Yaron

Designation
Vice-Chair, Council for Higher Education of Israel, Israel

Synopsis
In different countries, higher education refers to different kinds of "post-secondary", or "3rd level education". While some versions of “higher education” can be acquired by different means, I will argue that academic education must be associated with higher education institutions, that is: “universities” or “colleges”. The evolution of academic studies (e.g., from liberal arts to professional academic degrees, from campus based education to on-line teaching) challenges the structure of higher education institutions. I will point out few basic features that must be preserved – which are characteristics of universities, and distinguishes them from “schools”.  

In my talk I will analyze the case of Higher Education in Israel. While built on the European tradition, the higher education in Israel has been strongly influenced by the US system. This hybrid system has succeeded to provide high level scientific achievement together with a solid engine to innovation, and is now dealing with universal challenges.
Title
Styles and Innovations in Technical Education: Relationships of Research and Teaching

Speaker
Professor Kristin Wood

Designation
Head of Engineering and Product Development Pillar, Singapore University of Technology and Design, Singapore

Synopsis
In last two decades, several pedagogical themes and schemas have been explored in higher education. These pedagogies seek to address a number of fundamental educational questions. They also seek to develop a mindset and skillset in students to prepare them for the world's grand challenges and innovation opportunities. In this presentation, we gaze through the lens of a number of initiatives in technical, e.g., engineering, education, in recent history, across nations, and from the perspective of new, frontier programs. As an example of these initiatives, we describe and discuss the opportunities and bold initiatives currently being carried out by Singapore's fourth national university: The Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD). SUTD is developed in collaboration with MIT to nurture technically-grounded leaders and innovators to serve societal needs.

As a research intensive university, SUTD explores the boundaries and relationships of scholarly research and teaching. Classical boundaries of educational and research programs are merging and transforming. As an example, a concept known as Big-D Design permeates SUTD's vision and merging of these boundaries. Big-D includes architectural design, product design, software design, systems design and basically all technically grounded design. It is design through conception, development, prototyping, manufacturing, operation, maintenance, and sustainability – the full value chain. It includes an understanding of the liberal arts, humanities, and social sciences. In short, Big-D encompasses the art and science of design in a modern educational setting. In this presentation, we connect the Big-D concept with styles and innovation in technical higher education, providing basic principles and concrete examples.