Day 1, PM

The Rise of Higher Education in Asia and its Impact on the Global Landscape

Higher Education in Asia is gaining increasing prominence as the number of quality of higher education institutions increases, and the number of graduates also grows in tandem. We will examine the unique value proposition of Asian Higher Education, the comparative advantage that Asian models of higher education bring to the table, and its implications on the global higher education and research landscape.


Time/Room: 2.15 pm – 3.45 pm / Leo
Moderator: Professor Lily Kong, Provost, Singapore Management University, Singapore


Title
The Tripartite Academic World

Speaker
Professor Bertil Andersson

Designation
President, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

Synopsis
The academic world is changing rapidly with the rise of new centres of expertise, especially in Asia. We can no longer think in terms of an Atlantic academic excellence axis between Europe and North America but we must now take into account the rise of Asia. Japan has had a long record of academic expertise but we are also seeing the rise of new intellectual powers in China, Korea and Singapore.

This rise follows the changes in socio-economic development and expansion in the East and South-East Asia regions, which have been particularly rapid over the past two decades. It is expected that the East will start to influence Western academia, with more Asian universities elevated into the Ivy League category.
Title
Higher Education in India – Vision 2030

Speaker
T.V. Mohandas Pai

Designation
Chairman, Manipal Global Education Pvt Ltd, India Chairman, FICCI Higher Education Committee

Synopsis
The global economy is undergoing an epochal transformation with a predominant shift to services and capital –intensive manufacturing from labour-intensive manufacturing and agriculture. The Asian economy including India is also witnessing this transition. Innovation will be the key driver of economic growth and development, given the knowledge-based economy that the society is passing through. We have seen countries like China, Korea and Singapore, transform from developing to advanced economies in a short span of time due to strategic planning and a larger vision that correlated economic development to reforms in the education sector, in particular higher education and research.  

In 2030, India is expected to be the fastest growing economy touching a GDP of USD 10 trillion and one of the youngest nations in the world with a median age of 32. The greying developed world is expected to face a skilled talent shortage of approximately 56 million by 2030 and India alone is expected to provide a labour surplus of 47 million. Hence the responsibility of providing a skilled workforce to the world would heavily rest on India, as one in every four graduates in the world would be a product of the Indian higher education system.  

Against this backdrop, I have divided my presentation into five parts. The first part of the presentation gives an overview of the Asian higher education. It highlights the unprecedented economic growth in Asia since 1970s that has driven major social and institutional reforms including higher education. Factors such as high birth rates, increase in school participation rates, perceived importance of advanced education  and subsequent life opportunities have been attributed for  the explosive enrolment growth in higher education across Asia over the last 20 years. The phenomenal expansion has also been propelled by favourable demography, enabling policy decisions and conducive external economic circumstances. The latter slides of the first part draws a comparative analysis of the GDP of various regional blocks of Asia( such as ASEAN, Japan , China etc) and also highlights the world's top ten fastest growing economies.  

The second part of the presentation, while projecting India as the third largest economy, also presents a brief economic overview along with its demographic indicators. There is also a succinct comparison of the past decadal GDP growth rates of India.
Title
The Rising Impact of Asian Higher Education in the World

Speaker
Professor Song Yonghua

Designation
Executive Vice-President, Zhejiang University, People's Republic of China

Synopsis
Prof. Song Yonghua will introduce the history of higher education in China, and provide an overview of China's accomplishments in higher education in recent years, talent cultivation and international co-operation in China's higher education, , and the evolution of the international competitiveness of C9 universities in China. Taking Zhejiang University as an example, Prof. Song will elaborate on its strategy and measures to build a world-class university, as well as the vision, goal and roadmap to construct an international campus. Prof. Song will also discuss the potential problems and challenges faced by developing countries, specifically in Asia, in promoting education internationalization, as well as their impact on the global landscape.

Topic: The development of private higher education
Time/Room: 4.15 pm to 5.45 pm / Virgo 2 – 4


Title
Acting our Age? Challenges, Opportunities and Lessons: Mature Systems of Private Higher Education in a Changing Global Marketplace

Speaker
Dr Michael K Thomas (MODERATOR)

Designation
President and CEO, New England Board of Higher Education, USA

Synopsis
This presentation considers critical trends and issues related to the world's fastest growing segment of postsecondary education—and the role of private institutions in the ongoing massification of higher education.  It will provide a framework for assessing the development of private higher education; incorporate lessons and perspectives from the "mature" sector of private higher education in the United States; address the emergence of for-profit, private institutions and issues of quality assurance; and consider what challenges and opportunities the future holds for private higher education in Asia and other regions experiencing notable growth.
Title
Developments in Private Education Sector in Singapore

Speaker
Mr Brandon Lee

Designation
Chief Executive, Council for Private Education, Singapore

Synopsis
Mr Brandon Lee will be sharing his thoughts on the development of Singapore's private higher education sector, as well as its progress-to-date. He will also be sharing some of his views on how the sector can raise the bar on quality to gear up for the new economy and the increasing demand for skills mastery.
Title
Development of Private Higher Education in Germany

Speaker
Professor Klaus Hekking

Designation
Chairman of the Board, German Private Universities Association, Germany

Synopsis
The demand for private education institutions in Germany has grown rapidly in the recent past. At the moment there are 121 private post-secondary institutions in Germany. Since 2000 the number of private institutions has tripled. Despite recent growth, just seven percent of students go private in Germany, well under the average of 29 percent in the OECD club of economically developed states, according to 2011 figures published by the Federal Statistics Office. Private universities of applied sciences are attracting the most students, hosting roughly 85 percent of all those in private post-secondary education. Law, economics and social sciences are the most popular courses. Private universities in Germany stand for excellent academic training. The students discover new horizons with the optimal mix of theory and practice and benefit from international networks with worldwide businesses. The drop-out rate is also lower, about eight percent compared to 20 percent in the state sector.

Topic: Beyond competition: collaboration and sustainability in higher education and research , in Asia and beyond
Time/Room: 4.15 pm to 5.45 pm / Gemini 1 – 2


Title
Beyond Competition: Collaboration in Singapore's Higher Education Landscape

Speaker
Dr Lily Chan (MODERATOR)

Designation
CEO, NUS Enterprise, National University of Singapore, Singapore

Synopsis
Globalization has increased opportunities for collaboration among higher education providers, but also led to a new plane of competition. In this session, Dr Lily Chan will overview the changes affecting universities around the world and discuss innovative new areas in which they can work together. Particular emphasis will be given to the experiences of the National University of Singapore and its efforts to develop an entrepreneurial ecosystem by working with global partners."
Title
A Bridge that Lasts; Can We Engineer the Organic?

Speaker
Mr Mike Proctor

Designation
Vice President, Global Initiatives, The University of Arizona, USA

Synopsis
Legitimate academic collaboration, like knowledge creation itself, is an inherently organic process built upon the relationships between faculty across political and institutional boundaries. But even the most successful collaborations can be challenged by changing interests or altered funding streams. Universities regularly attempt to support these collaborations through various institutionalized models, with varying degrees of success. In recent years, however, the emergence of globally-recognized grand challenges, the convergence of disciplines to address these challenges, and wider access to information technology and modeling capacity have facilitated the rapid development of critical transnational research teams. Can governments and institutions take advantage of this changing landscape of collaborative tools and models to create stable and sustainable consortia, networks, multi-national laboratories or other structures yielding the benefits of traditional bilateral models?  What are key challenges and opportunities to be considered?
Title
The Implications of Expanding Graduate Education and Scientific Co-operation in Asia

Speaker
Ms Chiao-Ling Chien

Designation
Assistant Programme Specialist, UNESCO Institute for Statistics, Education Indicators and Data Analysis

Synopsis
Graduate education in many Asian countries has expanded in response to the growth of undergraduate enrolment, demand for more research, and high university rankings. Some national governments believe that the expansion of graduate education may strengthen national research and innovation, which would drive national economic development. Such a belief has motivated governments to provide generous funds for university research and designate research universities. However, we argue that the presumed link between university-based research and the economic payoffs that governments expect needs for a careful look at the evidence. This presentation will describe the extent of and reasons for expanding graduate education and cross-country scientific collaboration amongst universities in Asia. In addition, this presentation will show that pockets of excellence are found across a wide range of universities, not just in those near the top in world rankings. Implications for educational policy and planning will be discussed. 

Topic: What the developments in Asian higher education might mean for the rest of the world
Time/Room: 4.15 pm to 5.45 pm / Aquarius 1 – 3


Title
It All Depends on Asian Creativity and Originality

Speaker
Professor Rolf Tarrach (MODERATOR)

Designation
President, European University Association

Synopsis
Asian HE is developing quickly. What it will mean to the rest of the world hinges upon it being different and capable of offering new perspectives on the challenges of HE. If it merges the best of Asian traditions and European/American traditions, creating a coherent "modern" Asian HE system, the rest of the world will profit immensely. Keeping the exceptional characteristics of a job in academia, the civilizing influence of HE, the pre-eminence of responsibility over regulation and of societal benefit beyond the individual one are all features that will benefit the rest of the world, which is often struggling with them.
Title
The Impact of the Rise of Higher Education in Asia on the Rest of the World

Speaker
Mr Steve Egan CBE

Designation
Vice-President (Implementation), University of Bath, United Kingdom

Synopsis
Asian economies have experienced high levels of growth in recent years. Economic success has enabled greater investment in higher education with the prospect of sustainable and continued growth. But what of the impact on the rest of the world? This talk focus's on student mobility, research and innovation and HE system design. The economy of HE has changed throughout the world as a result of the rise of higher education in Asia, creating greater potential to address global problems such as climate change or security. Student mobility can promote greater understanding and tolerance across the globe. But as market forces intensify could the impacts of competition change the nature of Higher education with league tables creating hierarchies that can be both positive and negative. This talk will survey the scene and discuss the issues involved.
Title
Asian Universities, Global Aspirations: Homogenization and Differentiation of Higher Education

Speaker
Professor Lily Kong

Designation
Provost, Singapore Management University, Singapore

Synopsis
While the 1800s have been labelled the British century, the 1900s the American century, many have labelled the 2000s the Asian century.  In economics and politics, Asian countries are increasingly significant players on the world stage.  In higher education, Asian universities are similarly on the rise.  Part of the development has had to do with emulating the established universities in the west, with ambitions such as being the "Harvard of the east" or more generally, the "Boston of the east" declared aspirationally.  This has sometimes come with partnerships between western and Asian universities/businesses to develop new campuses, and at other times, tutelage by western universities to develop new Asian ones.  Universities in Asia have also sought to become internationally competitive, by which the standards and measures of success have been defined by the achievements of established universities in Europe and North America.  The question arises therefore whether universities risk become more homogenized in one sense, or whether Asian universities, in their global aspirations, can help to develop differentiation in the global higher education sector, and bring new insights and practices to education, research and societal impact.  Are there evidences of "global universities with Asian characteristics" as opposed to "Asian universities adopting global models"?